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*ALL THINGS HAPPEN IN FIVES, OR ARE DIVISIBLE BY OR ARE MULTIPLES OF FIVE, OR ARE SOMEHOW DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY APPROPRIATE TO FIVE

With that in mind, we’ve been a touch on the busy side lately. The Orange Bikes range has never seen such a large overhaul, revising older models and the introduction of completely new ones. We've been burning the midnight oil poring over geometry tables, listening to rider feedback and getting up at the crack of dawn to ride lots of prototypes to deliver what we believe to be our best range of bikes to date.

1 & 2: STAGE 5 and STAGE 6

The Stage 5 and Stage 6 have been stalwarts of the Orange range since their introduction two and a half years ago. Ahead of their time at their release it has given us plenty to think about while considering what is possible with longer travel 29er bikes.

Some aspects of the frames have remained the same, they are still hand built in our factory in the U.K, they still only have one pivot and we still believe that the answer to a problem isn’t by making it more complicated.

Orange Stage 6 XTR


Orange Stage XTR

Both bikes have seen considerable changes, if we firstly start with the Stage 6. We’ve kept the same suspension travel numbers as previous with 160mm travel up front and 150mm out back, however the bike now has a 210x55 metric shock and as we did with the Five and Alpine we’ve increased the amount of progression in the system. We’ve also moved the pivot position with the help of an asymmetrical swing arm to allow the bearing housing to pass the top of the chain ring, this has helped reduce anti squat and pedal kick back numbers to create a more neutral suspension feel. The head angle is now 1.5° slacker at 64°, and the seat angle has been steepened to 76°. All bikes will come fitted with a reduced offset fork.

We’ve roughly maintained the same effective top tube length meaning that while sat pedalling there is still a good amount of room in the cockpit but it also means we’ve been able to increase the reach of the bike so people will not need to up-size to get the reach numbers they want. The size large Stage 6 previously had a reach of 462mm while the new bike has a reach of 484mm. The bottom bracket is now 5mm lower than previous versions, the cable routing has been revised to have a cleaner look and stay out of harm's way and bottle bosses are now available on the underside of the downtube.

Orange Stage 6 Highlights

  • F: 160MM | R: 150MM | W: 29
  • Lightweight Frame Handbuilt in Britain
  • 5 year frame warranty with Limited Lifetime Crash Replacement
  • Unique monocoque aluminium chassis
  • New Orange Race Tuned geometry
  • New Streamlined cable routing
  • New Frame bottle bosses
  • Internal dropper seatpost cable routing
  • Fox Factory suspension
  • Shimano XTR M9100 12 speed drivetrain
  • Available in 4 model specs: Pro, RS, Factory and XTR
  • Choose from 6 custom colours

Geometry Info for the 2020 Stage 6

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MY20 Orange Stage 5

Orange Stage 5 Factory


Not to be up-staged, the Stage 5 is more capable than ever, benefitting from the same updates as the stage 6 but in a smaller punchier package. The Stage 5 now sports a 210x50 metric shock with better progression than its predecessor, we’ve also moved the pivot position with the help of an asymmetrical swing arm to allow the bearing housing to pass the top of the chain ring, this has helped reduce anti squat and pedal kick back numbers to create a more neutral suspension feel. The head angle is 1.5° slacker at 65° and the seat angle now sits at 76° and all bikes will have reduced offset forks as standard. The bottom bracket is now 10mm lower than previous, the cable routing has been revised to have a cleaner look and stay out of harms way and bottle bosses are now available on the underside of the down tube.

Both bikes will be available in three sizes, will have under lacquer decals and you’ll have 6 custom colours to choose from including 2 matt finishes. Prices for the Stage 6 start at £4300 with prices on the Stage 5 starting at £4100

We’ve improved our warranty policy on all models, so not only do you get a 5-year frame warranty (1year on DH bike) but we will also offer a lifetime crash replacement policy to the original owner where we will heavily reduce the cost of any replacement you may need.

Geometry Info for the 2020 Stage 5

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Orange Stage 5 Highlights

  • F: 140MM | R: 135MM | W: 29
  • Lightweight Frame Handbuilt in Britain
  • 5 year frame warranty with Limited Lifetime Crash Replacement
  • Unique monocoque aluminium chassis
  • New Orange Trail Tuned geometry
  • New Reduced offset fork
  • New Streamlined cable routing
  • New Bottle Bosses
  • Fox Factory suspension
  • Shimano XT M8100 12spd drivetrain
  • Available in 4 model specs: Pro, RS, Factory and XTR
  • Choose from 6 custom colours
  • Geometry Info for the 2020 Stage 5

3: SURGE 29

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Two down, three to go. Hot on the heels of our newest E.P.O (Electric Powered Orange) model, the Surge, we now introduce the Surge 29. The Surge 29 takes many of its traits from the new Stage 6: 64° head angle; 76 degree seat angle; reduced offset fork; increased reach and a metric shock, but it also incorporates Shimano’s newest 8035 battery technology. The revised battery has meant that we are now able to considerably reduce the size of the down tube, add an On/Off switch to the top tube and the battery is now removable without a key.

With 29” wheels, 160mm travel at the front and 150mm at the rear this bike is prepared to go wherever you are willing to take it. All our U.K built E-bikes for 2020 will have 8035 batteries and their accompanied benefits as well as Maxxis EXO+ tyres as standard. For the Surge and Charger there will be 5 specs (S, Pro, RS, Factory and XTR) while the Surge, Surge 29 and Phase will have 4 specs (Pro, RS, Factory and XTR) All bikes will be available in a selection of 4 custom colours. Prices start at £6000 for Surge, £5900 for Charger and £6700 for Surge 29.

Orange Surge 29 Highlights

  • F: 160MM | R: 150MM | W: 29
  • Frame designed and built in Britain
  • 5 year frame warranty with Limited Lifetime Crash Replacement
  • New slimmer downtube with Shimano 8035 battery
  • New Quick release battery
  • New 'On' switch on top tube
  • Boost 148mm rear hub spacing
  • Alpine-trail honed geometry
  • Reduced offset fork
  • Long top tube short stem for high-speed stability
  • Shimano E8000 250W drive unit with 70Nm torque
  • 504Wh Lithium Ion battery for up to 100km assist
  • Same 177mm Q-Factor as a standard XT crankset
  • Choose from 4 custom colours

Geometry Info for the 2020 Surge 29

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4 & 5: SWITCH 6 and PHASE

So that brings me onto our fourth and fifth bikes. So what's going here? The only thing we can agree on is that no one can agree on what we should call them, but everyone loves riding them, is it a Penny Farthing? Is it a Mullet bike? Is it a Hybrid mutt? Well, in our case it's the real deal, with correct geometry for a mixed size wheelset. A race pedigree if ever there was one.

They are bikes that ooze with buckets of front wheel grip through technical and greasy terrain while still allowing for a more playful character in turns and through jumps, you even get the added benefit of more clearance over your rear wheel in steep terrain. Add to that the 29er wheel climbing benefits like improved “roll over” we know and love, while only needing to spin up a smaller sized wheel at the rear and to be able to efficiently pump the terrain you’re riding. There aren’t a great deal of negatives.

Whatever you call mixed wheel bikes, it’s certainly worth riding one. Boldly going into production, we'll build the bikes, you guys will come up with the category.

Orange Switch 6

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The Switch 6 is our first mixed wheel size bike, 29” wheel upfront with 160mm of travel and 27.5 wheel out back with 145mm. The bike comes with all the updates that we’ve intergrated into our newest models; Metric shock, 76 degree seat angle, 64 degree head angle, 485mm reach on a size large and a reduced offset fork.

The bike will be available in 4 specs (Pro, RS, Factory and XTR) with prices ranging from £4300-£6500 with a choice of four custom colours.

Orange Switch 6 Highlights

  • F: 160MM | R: 145MM | W: 29/27.5
  • Lightweight Frame Handbuilt in Britain
  • Brand New Monocoque 6061-T6 aluminium frame
  • 5 year frame warranty with Limited Lifetime Crash Replacement
  • New 29 front/27.5 rear mixed size wheelset
  • Orange race tuned geometry
  • New Reduced offset fork
  • Streamlined cable routing
  • Steeper seat angle
  • New Frame bottle bosses
  • Ultimate “Do it all” bike
  • Choose from 4 custom colours

Geometry Info for the 2020 Switch 6

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Orange Phase

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The Phase is our first mixed wheel size E.P.O model. The positives which made us consider the producing the Switch 6 were also applicable to an E-bike and from then on the concept for the Phase was born. With a 29” front wheel and 160mm of travel paired with a 27.5 rear wheel and 160 mm of travel this could potentially be our most versatile E.P.O model to date.

The Phase will be fitted with a Shimano 8035 battery, will have a keyless battery removal system with the power button fitted to the top tube. The phase has a 64 degree head angle and a 76 degree seat angle with a reach measurement on a size large being 488 mm, the bike will also be fitted with a 230x65 metric shock and a reduced offset fork. We will have 4 specs available (Pro, RS, Factory and XTR) with four custom colour options. Pricing will start at £6700.

Orange Phase Highlights

  • F: 160MM | R: 160MM | W: 29/27.5
  • Frame designed and built in Britain
  • 5 year frame warranty with Limited Lifetime
  • Crash Replacement
  • New 29 front/27.5 rear mixed size wheelset
  • New Slimmer downtube with Shimano 8035 battery
  • New Quick release battery
  • New 'On' switch on top tube
  • Boost 148mm rear hub spacing
  • Orange trail honed geometry
  • Reduced offset fork
  • Long top tube short stem for high-speed stability
  • Shimano E8000 250W drive unit with 70Nm torque
  • 504Wh Lithium Ion battery for up to 100km assist
  • Same 177mm Q-Factor as a standard XT crankset
  • Choose from 4 custom colours

Geometry Info for the 2020 Phase

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So that’s everything from us… well kind of. We’ve also updated the Clockwork Evo and Clockwork Evo 29, the P7 29, expanded our gravel offering in the RX9 range, we’re launching the X9 and the E-Rush is ready to go!

www.orangebikes.co.uk

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sspomer sspomer 9/4/2019 7:40 AM

10 comments newest first

All these long chainstays reminds me of that FIM E-Xbike race, where almost everyone was racing while firmly sitting their ass in the saddle. Are they forgetting the importance of fore-aft balance in vehicle dynamics, with this overly forward weight bias design?

The Phase is the exception. That one looks dialed. If only they did something as simple as putting scales under each wheel and measuring the weight distro and tried to design in fore aft balance with CS and WB length, get it more to 60% rear 40% front out of the saddle (maybe 65:35 in saddle), rather than 55:45 or worse (worse being even more forward, like 50:50). I'd expect 450mm CS for 1300mm WB. A lot of brands are getting it right with 435mm CS for 1230ish WB (430 for 1210, 425 for 1190, etc.).

Can't do much about the linear shock stroke without adding complexity. Rather have better geo, even if it results in less progressiveness in the shock. Just move the shock forward and steepen the STA to get more rear wheel clearance. Shorten the seat tube to 15" for the smallest size while you're at it, and cap the length to 18" in largest, because 210mm droppers exist.

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At least some company is doing bikes with longer chainstays and uninterupted seat tubes. My current bike has 459 chainstays and 395 reach 27.5/29 wheels, and there is not too much weight on the front wheel. I think 469 chainstays paired with 64ha and 435 reach for a medium would be pretty ideal.
I think it is silly of you to talk so surely that this will be too much weight on front wheel, when youve never even ridden such a bike. Based on all your comments i doesnt seem like you have a good understanding of how bike weight distribution works.

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Stay off the jumps and drops, else you will learn what too much weight on the front feels like the hard way when you (and your bike) become a lawn dart. Can't wait to hear your complaints about your lower back being sore and your worries about buzzing your ass on the rear tire, from needing to shift your weight back, to compensate for the bike having too much weight up front.

Good luck figuring out why you can't copy Loic Bruni's riding style where he stays mostly centered and motionless besides his arms, because you think you should have chainstays that are 40mm longer despite having similar wheelbase... oh wait, you don't even consider the wheelbase, being picky instead about HA and reach.

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as a tallish person i would actually like to see more brands extending their chainstays. no matter how many pushups you can do - your legs will always be stronger than your arms and can take quite a bit more beating. side benefit would be less shaky sight.

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I don't get your push-up comment. The ideal stance is a neutral one that uses your core and legs, with the arms not pushing nor pulling and not using your lower back to hold up your upper body. Coaches train up many kids using such a stance: it's called the athletic position. It's different from the bend at the waist position, which might have you doing push-ups/pull-ups.

CS too long has your lower back doing a lot of bump absorption as you are pushing yourself back into sort of an aero position, with butt over the rear wheel, in order to compensate for the 55:45 weight bias (by getting weight more rearward to make that equivalent to 60:40). If you don't, you have problems like the rear wheel taking a taller trajectory than the front wheel off of jumps.

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well in that „internet was wrong, short chainstays suck“ thread you did some math and stated short chainstays make a rider have to weigh the front. i dont see how that is so different to my post. on a yeti sb150 size XL the FC/CS ratio exeeds 1.9 and makes you have to weigh the front more than necessary... in my opinion. just saying... sorry i hope that doesnt break your internet

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I'm suggesting that the brands do the scale measurement for weight bias, not use some shitty FC/CS ratio that is meaningless. Hard to simplify it into easy math--I can't even imagine how they can even simulate it accurately. Most brands are simply guessing regarding where the bike's CoM is, with rider on board. How do they even determine what position to put them in, to consistently compare with all other bikes?

That's why I suggest the scale measurement, with a rider in an effortless/comfortable natural/neutral standing position, one that isn't pulling nor pushing on the bars.

This way, they can tune the CS according to the WB (or size), rather than simply keeping CS the same and adding or subtracting 1-2" to the seat tube and top tube for each size.

Santa Cruz making all their newly released bikes have adjustable chainstay lengths is a start. Forbidden is doing it right with their Druid. Norco is probably just guessing, if their Revolver is anything to go by. YT is starting to get it too. Seems that only Forbidden has CS dialed for S and M though...

The industry trend seems to dial in bikes using pro athlete feedback, who tend to be L (XC racers mostly XL). The SB150 is an exception, since they dialed it in for the EWS racers and arbitrarily called it a M, when such dimensions typically belong on a L.

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